Saturday, July 22, 2017

Let's bring back some, but not all, politically-incorrect and unfashionbable words and concepts....


Sense of responsibility


Sick


Diseased


Catch a disease


Infected


Dead


Dead people


Insane


Psychiatric


Maniac


Manic


Unhappy


Sad


Desolate


Inconsolable


Neglect


Neglected child


Abandoned


Drunk


Alcoholic


Drug addict


Intoxicated


Inebriated


Slob


Thug


Despot


Tyrant


Tyranical


Wimp


Sook


Wife


Husband


Married


Unmarried


Childless


Spouse


Single


Miss


Master


Young lady


Young man


Educated


Uneducated


Civilized


Uncivilized


Personal standards


Discipline


Common


Crude


Obscene


Foul-mouthed


Polite


Good manners


Refined


Deportment


Elocution


Disreputable


Prostitute


Tart


Kerb-crawler


Promiscuous


Philanderer


Sleaze


Smut


Smutty


Filthy


Dirty old man


Pervert


Child molester


Exhibitionist


Serendipity


Getting fleeced


Daylight robbery


Matronly


Stout


Plump


Rotund


Portly


Gaunt


Thin


Skinny


Rich


Poor


Destitute


Scientism


Fanatic


Fanaticism


Religious fanatic


Rejoice


Jubilation


Hallelujah


Forgiveness


Gratitude



5 comments:

Adelaide Dupont said...

Lili Marlene:

I see you write kerb the American way. With a K and a E.

When I was reading about the National Broadband Network - there was a lot of fibre to the curb/kerb.

This is part of the Labor compromise - maybe better on Never Heard of the Bloke.

And was mania/maniac ever unfashionable? Seems not?

Dysphoric is a currently fashionable concept though it is deeply politically incorrect.

Lili Marlene said...

I had never thought of the word "curb" as a noun or as an alternative spelling of the word "kerb". I thought I had a good grasp of the English language, but you've taught me something new.

I was thinking the terms "mania" and "maniac" have probably been overtaken with the over-popularity of the concept and term "bipolar". The term "maniac" used to be given to people who were generally over-the-top in some way or a bit of a menace. Could well be that some were on a bipolar upswing, in hindsight.


I'm not so familiar with the term "dysphoric", although I recall it has been used in psychiatric diagnosis. I think it is more to do with dissatisfaction than an intrinsic unhappiness? There are many good reasons to feel dissatisfaction for sure.

Steven C Watson said...

Someone has things upside down. Curb is the North American spelling in the bastard argot that passes for English over there. Here in England we spell the edge of the pavement kerb. Since its OUR language, that lot over the Pond can get lost. :-)

The dysphoria of the moment is "Gender Dysphoria"; wibbling on about transexuality is about as PC as you can get!

Apologies for the late comment, I've only just come across your blog, by way of finding out who on earth Helen Dale, formerly Darville, was. There is an awful lot of rubbish in the blogosphere, so so it is refreshing to come across a level-headed, forthright, and cogent blog now and again. Tah very muchly.

Lili Marlene said...

Welcome to my world, Mr Watson! I'm sure we could find many things to agree and disagree about.

I harbour a suspicion that the current wave of interest in transgender transformations could be a product of rampant popularity and marketing of gender stereotype ideas in psychology (see research and pop psychology publications by Baron-Cohen et al) in children's toys and clothes and in Western culture in general, and also a product of a decline in the use of job or occupation as a foundation of personal identity, due to unstable, meaningless or non-existent working lives. But all the same, I'm not going to be the one to tell anyone who they are or how to dress.

Lili Marlene said...

You know, the funny thing about the Helen Demidenko thing is that the story seems to have been forgotten in Australia. Years ago when I was trying to get hold of books from around 1996 to research her biography secondhand books had become hard to source, and one staffer in one of those musty sheds full of crap old books told me that they'd never stock such books, as though the whole episode was to be forgotten. It seems the lesson about the pretention and gullibility of the Australian literary establishment has been lost.